Collabra introduces the pay-it-forward, revenue-sharing, model



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Pilot Launched: Funding Open Access for Post-Grant FP7 Publications


goldfp7 v1European researchers to benefit from €4m fund to cover the costs of Open Access publishing for post grant FP7 publications
Launching in Spring 2015, a pilot aimed at stimulating publishing in Open Access journals in Europe will provide funding to cover all or part of the costs of post-grant open access publishing arising from projects funded under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). The pilot forms part of the EU-funded OpenAIRE2020 project.
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Update on Open Access Policies

Latest changes on Open Access Policies per country/funding agencies:
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Open Journal of Medicine: The really free and open biomedical journal

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Open Journal of Medicine  (ISSN: 2174-680X) is a journal published by iMedPub for Internet Medical Society. It has been created as a challenge to provide authors with a system for publishing articles open access for free with high quality of publishing standards.
We offer an innovative publishing system where all manuscripts received meeting the standards are accepted directly in the version provided by authors. This system is called self-publishing.

Open access
OJM provides unrestricted access to all its articles. OJM applies the Creative Commons Attribution License (CCAL) to all works we publish (read the human-readable summary or the full license legal code). Under the CCAL, authors retain ownership of the copyright for their article, but authors allow anyone to download, reuse, reprint, modify, distribute, and/or copy article, so long as the original authors and source are cited. Learn more on the benefits of publishing open access in our blog.

Indexing
Articles published in OJM receive a DOI and are indexed in GoogleScholar, SHERPA/ROMEO, SWETS, DeepDive, ProQuest, EBSCO, HINARI and Scientific Commons.

Archiving
This journal utilizes the LOCKSS system to create a distributed archiving system among participating libraries and permits those libraries to create permanent archives of the journal for purposes of preservation and restoration. We also archive all articles in Medbrary, the online medical library, and Scribd. In addition we support self archiving: make your research visible and accessible to your peers by uploading a full-text version of this publication to your institution's archive or anywhere else.
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iMedPub launches Open Journal of Medicine: the really open and free medical journal

Open Journal of Medicine (ISSN: 2174-680X) is a journal published byiMedPub for Internet Medical Society. It has been created as a challenge to provide authors with a system for publishing articles open access for free with high quality of publishing standards. We offer an innovative publishing system where all manuscripts received meeting the standards are accepted directly in the version provided by authors. This system is called self-publishing.




Traditionally, authors submit their manuscripts to scientific journals where manuscripts were subjected to rounds of peer-review until the manuscript was finally accepted or rejected. This process well may take months or even years with authors always at the expenses of editors’ decisions. Self-publishing allows authors to publish their works directly. As articles are published in the submitted version, authors do not incur in article processing charges or submission charges so publishing is completely free. 

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President Obama: Make Publicly Funded Research Freely Available!

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Open-access scientific publishing is gaining ground

At the beginning of April, Research Councils UK, a conduit through which the government transmits taxpayers’ money to academic researchers, changed the rules on how the results of studies it pays for are made public. From now on they will have to be published in journals that make them available free—preferably immediately, but certainly within a year.
In February the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy told federal agencies to make similar plans. A week before that, a bill which would require free access to government-financed research after six months had begun to wend its way through Congress. The European Union is moving in the same direction. So are charities. And SCOAP3, a consortium of particle-physics laboratories, libraries and funding agencies, is pressing all 12 of the field’s leading journals to make the 7,000 articles they publish each year free to read. For scientific publishers, it seems, the party may soon be over.
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Open access explained


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